All Posts By

Daniel Vilhelmsson Wesén

Lessons Learned

Slow pace

Elsa started walking at 12 months so during the first year she was not moving so much. In cold weather, covered in insulation, crawling is as challenge in itself and we found her happy to mostly sit and explore things. We’ve spent days discovering leafs, small bugs, birds, looking at clouds, animals, roots and stones. Things I haven’t looked at with a deep interest as a grown-up, but with Elsa I rediscovered a lot of things and I’ve seen things I wouldn’t  have seen in the same way without her. There are times when Elsa laughed at waves in the ocean, followed a bird until it disappeared behind a hill or a house and then looked at me for answers. For us, the key has been to have multiple choices and not a hundred must-do’s during the trip. During the first year I think we had our best adventures when we walked less, took a lot of breaks for waterfalls, holding sticks, scouted for squirrels, did campfires and found happiness in small things, being in the moment without needing or longing for anything more. Leaning against trees and watching whatever passed by.

Carrying

We most often use a full buckle carrier for carrying Elsa when we’re out. There is a range of different brands and fits so the best tip is to try a few different to really find one that suits you. During the first year we have mostly used an Integra carrier. It is simple to use, has a snug fit and if you carry your baby in the front you can comfortably carry a backpack at the same time since the shoulder straps are thin. From around 6 months of age (when the baby can sit without support) it is possible to carry her on the back. Different people have different solutions. Elsa is now 15 months and I still prefer to carry her in the front; as she has grown it get’s more difficult to see your feet and the next step as clear, but at the same time you can interact with your child easily and you have the possibility to carry a backpack as well. When we carry her at the front we usually hold her feet or hands. It feels good and adds some extra protection from the elements. She also feels comfy and get som heat from us. For longer walks Emelie mostly carry her on the back nowadays as she feels that this is more comfortable now when Elsa is 10kg+, carrying the daily stuff in a waist bag instead of a backpack. She also carries a lot in woven wraps, and with these it’s easy to vary the type of carry. If you’re out for a night the other partner can carry the gear. 

More information shortly

Equipment lists

latest trailrunning endeavors

RUNNING IN
200 Icebreaker Leggings,
200 Icebreaker LS Crewe,
Shorts,
Fjällräven High Coast Wind Jacket,
Petzl Nao headlight,
Icebug shoes Acceleritas4,
Socks,
Boxer long ones

IN MY BACKPACK
Haglöfs LIM 25L,
Waterbottles 2x500ml,
Energybar and simple food,
200 Icebreaker Leggings,
200 Icebreaker LS Crewe,
Beanie Icebreaker,
Gloves Hestra Runners All Weather,
Fluffy jacket with hood,
Haglös Barrier III pants,
Socks Thicker Smartwool,
First Aid,
Hilleberg Tarp 10 UL,
Marmot Hydrogen sleepingbag,
Exped Airmat UL Lite M,
Boxers,
Small towel

Fjällräven Classic Denmark 2018

Backpack Fjällräven Kaipak 38L
Tent Fjällräven Abisko Lite1
Mattress Exped Airmat Lite UL 5 M
Sleeping bag Fjällräven Distance P5 XL
Exped Schnozzel pumpbag UL M
Kitchen Primus Lite+
Fire steel
Primus Gas 100 ml
Spork Titan
Moka pot
Lavazza Coffe 250g
Gerber multitool
Samsplit 36inch
CPR Pocket Resuscitator
First Aid (waterproof 4L bag)
Candy
Fold-A-Cup
Power Bank 10.000 with cables
Petzl Tikka+
Toilet bag (alcogel, paper, showel)
Toothpaste and toothbrush
Towel
Sunglasses
Socks X5
Underwear x4
T-shirt x2
Fjällräven Keb Eco-Shell jacket/pants
Fjällräven Keb Fleece Jacket
Keb Gaiter Trousers
Nalgene 1000ML x2
Sunblock
Mosquito repellent

Björnturen 2018

Backpack Fjällräven Kaipak 38L
Mattress Exped Airmat Lite UL 5 M
Sleeping bag Fjällräven Distance P5 XL
Exped Schnozzel pumpbag UL M
Kitchen Primus Lite+
Fire steel
100 ml gas
Spork Titan
Gerber multitool
Samsplit 36inch
CPR Pocket Resuscitator
First aid (bigger version)
Toilet bag (alcogel, paper, showel)
Toothpaste and toothbrush
Power Bank 10.000x with cables
Petzl Tikka+
Tent Marmot Limelight 2P
Towel
Sunglasses
Socks x3
Underwear x2
T-shirt x2
Fjällräven Keb Eco-Shell jacket
Woolpower Jacket 400
Moka pot
Coffe (150g)
Real Meal x2
Keb trousers (cold evenings)
Keb Gaiter Trouser shorts
Candy
Fold-A-Cup
Nalgene 500ML x2
Sunblock

Sleeping arrangement

Don’t go to bed cold. Do something before! A couple of jumping jacks or a short runt around the camp. While you’re at it wave your arms and smile.

Nalgene bottle with boiling water, add a sock over it and put it on your stomach, in your armpits, next to your feet or groin for more heat during the night.

Clean clothes. Don’t sleep in the clothes you had all day.

Pee before bed. A large volume of pee will make you cold and probably you have to go out in the middle of the night.

Eat something before going to bed. (Energy to warm your body).

Sleeping liner or long johns and a hat will help you stay warm and keep your sleeping bag cleaner. Long johns also prevent your thighs from glueing together after a long days hike.

During summer I prefer not to dry my clothes in the sleeping bag. In the sleeping bag you want to rest and get energy for the next day. During winter adventures I think a little different. I then put my Inreach, power bank, damp socks, warm nalgene bottle and other stuff there. I then wake up a couple of times during the night and have to move things around.

If your sleeping bag is too large you will easily get cold because you still have to heat up all the space you don’t really use. If you already have one or borrowed from a friend try to put a strap around it and close off the area you don’t use.

If your sleeping bag is to narrow you will put pressure on the sides of your sleeping bag and therefore the isolation will be more compact in that area. This will make you cold because the air in the isolation is minimised.

Get away from the wind. If you sleep under the stars without a tent or shelter the wind can “eat” its way into the bag and you will be cold during time. If you have a bigger backpack you can use it as a wind blocker. I once slept with a drybag 40L over my lower body and pointing towards the wind – it’s a good wind blocker. Also look for a bivvy bag if you repeatedly sleep under the stars.

If it’s cold outside a sleeping bag with collar will help you a lot. It will stop the warm air from getting out and cold air getting in. Every time you move, the air moves. If you have a fleece jacket or something but no collar you can put your fleece at chest heigh stopping cold air to get in and warm air to get out while sleeping.

If you know your sleeping mat can handle cold down towards 0 Celcius but it’s colder you can choose the ground you pitch your tent on more carefully and get away with some more. A cold rock would easily chill you down but if you see an area with higher grass or fluffy vegetation you can pitch your tent above it. When the area under your tent get flat it makes a lot of small airpockets that makes it better isolated.

Clean and dry skin makes everything more fun!